What is the Difference Between a Coordinating and Correlative Conjunction?


Coordinating and Correlative Conjunctions
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Coordinating and Correlative Conjunctions


Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses, showing the relationship between them. Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses. In addition, they show the relationship between these words, phrases, and clauses. There are some categories of conjunctions, including coordinating, correlative, and subordinate.


There are conjunctive adverbs, or transition words, which are another type of conjunction. Right now, we just want to focus on two of the main types of conjunctions, which are coordinating and correlative. These have similar definitions. The first is that they are joining grammatically equal words, phrases, or clauses. When we’re talking about words, phrases, or clauses we can be talking about two pronouns, two prepositional phrases, two independent clauses, etc.


Those pronouns, prepositional phrases, or independent clauses are just being joined by coordinating conjunctions. Some examples of coordinating conjunctions are: and, but, or, and nor. Then we have correlative conjunctions, which are used in pairs to join two or more words, phrases, or clauses that are grammatically equal.


You may be thinking that this is the same definition as we just looked at. We still are talking about grammatically equal words, phrases, or clauses, but this time we’re talking about them being used in pairs. Some examples of correlative conjunctions are: “both” paired with “and,” “not only” paired with “but also,” and then “either” paired with “or.”


Notice each time I have three dots in between two conjunctions. What that is signifying is that you have a conjunction, then you have words in between, and then another conjunction. When we talk about joining two or more words, phrases, or clauses, again, we can be talking about pronouns, prepositional phrases, or independent clauses.


Say, for example, you have two independent clauses. You could say “both,” then you put one independent clause, then you put “and” and write another independent clause. You’re using these conjunctions to join these two phrases, clauses, or words together.



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Last updated: 07/10/2018

 

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