VSEPR Theory

The VSEPR or vesper theory stands for Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion theory. So what has happened is Valence Shell Electron Pair surrounding an atom oriented as far away from each other as possible. So all these valence level electron pairs are trained to be as far away from each other as possible. And the reason they are doing that is because of the electron repulsion between them. Because electrons are negatively charged that when two electrons are near each other the negative charges want to be away from each other. So that’s why the valence level electron pairs are orienting themselves as far away from each other as possible. So in other words, the valence electrons will orient themselves far away from each other to minimize repulsion In VSEPR theory two types of pairs are important. So the first is goes those valence to electrons that are shared between atoms and covalent bonds. So we’re going to call those bonding pairs. So again bonding pairs are those electrons that are shared between atoms and covalent bonds. Sometimes two atoms will both need another electron to fill their outer shell and so those two atoms will form together or come together in a covalent bond to share their valence electron. So those are called bonding pairs. Now the second type of electron pairs that’s important in VSEPR Theory is what we’re going to call lone pairs. Lone pairs are those valence electrons that are not shared and are associated with one atom of the compound. So lone pairs are basically the opposite of bonding pairs. Whereas bonding pairs is those valence electrons that are shared, lone shares are by themselves and only belong to one atom. So the factors that influence the molecular shape are the number of atoms that bond into the central atom which determines the number of bonding pairs around the central atom and the number of lone pairs around the central tom. So that’s a brief description of the VSEPR Theory which stands vor valence shell electron pair repulsion.

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Last updated: 07/25/2017
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